Saturday, 23 February 2013

Latest Fighter Jets

Latest Fighter Jets Biography

In 2005 the New Zealand Ministry of Defence selected the NH90 helicopter to replace the RNZAF's ageing fleet of 14 UH-1H Iroquois. The NZ government allocated NZ$550 million to replace the Iroquois and a small fleet of Bell 47 (Sioux) training helicopters. In late 2005 the government announced that the surviving A-4Ks and Aermacchi MB-339Cs, 17 of each type, (not counting A-4s in museums), were to be sold to US company Tactical Air Systems for use in jet training, subject to the US government approval. Tactical Air Systems announced RNZAF colour schemes would be preserved, "out of respect for the history and traditions of the RNZAF". The US State Department expressed concerns about having two squadrons of combat jets operating over the US in private hands so the aircraft were put into storage at Woodbourne. The Aermacchi fleet is still in flying condition but the A4K fleet was covered in protective latex and moved to outside storage in 2007 to make way for the C-130H upgrade. It is most likely that the A-4Ks will be donated to museums or remain at RNZAF Base Woodbourne for training purposes for RNZAF Technicians, as the cost of refurbishing them (estimated at $34 million) was deemed too expensive by the government. As of September 2010 a buyer was still to be found for the remaining A-4Ks and MB-339Cs.
New Zealand took an option to purchase C-130J Hercules from Lockheed Martin as a part of an Australian purchase in the late 1990s but following the 1999 election the new Labour government decided not to proceed with the purchase. Instead a NZD$226m service life extension programme (LEP) was arranged with L3 Spar Aerospace of Canada in 2004.[24] This involved replacement of various mechanical, avionic, and structural components, and the design and installation of flight deck communications and navigation improvements to meet evolving air traffic management regulations.[25] The first aircraft was modified in Canada with the rest at Air New Zealand subsidiary, Safe Air, in Blenheim, New Zealand. The LEP will see the C-130 Hercules with the most flying hours in the world remain in use until about 2025.
Since 2001, RNZAF P-3K Orions and C-130 Hercules have made periodic deployments in support of Operation Enduring Freedom and the International Security Assistance Force in Afghanistan.40 Squadron Boeing 757-200 and C-130H Hercules flanked by 5 Squadron P-3K Orions breaking formation during the Whenuapai air show in March 2009.
The Naval Support Flight was separated from 3 Squadron to re-form 6 Squadron in October 2005.[citation needed] In October 2007 the government announced it had selected the Agusta A109 as the preferred replacement for the Sioux helicopters.[26] Defence Minister Phil Goff declared "In common with the Seasprite helicopter already in service and the eight new NH-90s on order for the RNZAF, the A109 is wheeled and capable of deployment from our Navy vessels". Chief of Air Force, Air Vice-Marshal Graham Lintott, said the A109 "will provide an effective platform to train aircrew in basic helicopter operations plus the advanced skills required to operate both the Navy SH-2G Seasprite and the highly capable RNZAF NH90 helicopter that will come into service in 2010
Latest Fighter Jets
Latest Fighter Jets
Latest Fighter Jets
Latest Fighter Jets
Latest Fighter Jets
Latest Fighter Jets
Latest Fighter Jets
Latest Fighter Jets
Latest Fighter Jets
Latest Fighter Jets
Latest Fighter Jets
Latest Fighter Jets
Latest Fighter Jets
Latest Fighter Jets
Latest Fighter Jets
Latest Fighter Jets
Latest Fighter Jets
Latest Fighter Jets
Latest Fighter Jets
Latest Fighter Jets

No comments:

Post a Comment

Post a Comment