Friday, 22 February 2013

Fighter Jet For Sale

Fighter Jet For Sale Biography

At the very end of the inter-war period in Europe came the Spanish Civil War. This was just the opportunity the German Luftwaffe, Italian Regia Aeronautica, and the Soviet Union's Red Air Force needed to test their latest aircraft. Each party sent numerous aircraft types to support their sides in the conflict. In the dogfights over Spain, the latest Messerschmitt Bf 109 fighters did well, as did the Soviet Polikarpov I-16. The German design had considerably more room for development however and the lessons learned led to greatly improved models in World War II. The Russians, whose side lost, failed to keep up and despite newer models coming into service, I-16s were outfought by the improved Bf 109s in World War II, while remaining the most common Soviet front-line fighter into 1942. For their part, the Italians developed several monoplanes such as the Fiat G.50, but being short on funds, were forced to continue operating obsolete Fiat CR.42 biplanes.
From the early 1930s the Japanese had been at war against both the Chinese Nationalists and the Russians in China, and used the experience to improve both training and aircraft, replacing biplanes with modern cantilever monoplanes and creating a cadre of exceptional pilots for use in the Pacific War. In the United Kingdom, at the behest of Neville Chamberlain, (more famous for his 'peace in our time' speech) the entire British aviation industry was retooled, allowing it to change quickly from fabric covered metal framed biplanes to cantilever stressed skin monoplanes in time for the war with Germany.
The period of improving the same biplane design over and over was now coming to an end, and the Hawker Hurricane and Supermarine Spitfire finally started to supplant the Gloster Gladiator and Hawker Fury biplanes but many of the former remained in front-line service well past the start of World War II. While not a combatant themselves in Spain, they absorbed many of the lessons learned in time to use them.
The Spanish Civil War also provided an opportunity for updating fighter tactics. One of the innovations to result from the aerial warfare experience this conflict provided was the development of the "finger-four" formation by the German pilot Werner Mölders. Each fighter squadron (German: Staffel) was divided into several flights (Schwärme) of four aircraft. Each Schwarm was divided into two Rotten, which was a pair of aircraft. Each Rotte was composed of a leader and a wingman. This flexible formation allowed the pilots to maintain greater situational awareness, and the two Rotten could split up at any time and attack on their own. The finger-four would become widely adopted as the fundamental tactical formation over the course of World War.[clarification needed]
[edit]World War II
Messerschmitt Bf 109G-2/Trop 'Black 6'
The Second World War featured fighter combat on a larger scale than any other conflict to date. German Field Marshal Erwin Rommel noted the effect of airpower: "Anyone who has to fight, even with the most modern weapons, against an enemy in complete command of the air, fights like a savage against modern European troops, under the same handicaps and with the same chances of success." Throughout the conflict, fighters performed their conventional role in establishing air superiority through combat with other fighters and through bomber interception, and many fighters were also pressed into service in additional roles such as tactical air support and reconnaissance.
The long-range Mitsubishi A6M Zero typified the highly maneuverable, but lightly armored, fighter design
The approach of different belligerents to fighter design varied widely, with the Japanese and Italians favoring lightly armed and armored but highly maneuverable designs such as the Japanese Nakajima Ki-27, Nakajima Ki-43 and Mitsubishi A6M Zero and Italy's Fiat G.50 and Macchi MC.200. In contrast, designers in Great Britain, Germany, the Soviet Union, and the United States believed that due to the increasing speed of fighter aircraft, the twisting and maneuvering typical of World War I dogfights would create g-forces unbearable to pilots. These nations' fighters instead were optimized for speed and firepower to allow pilots to quickly engage, dispatch and disengage with opposing aircraft. While light, highly maneuverable aircraft did have some advantages in fighter-versus-fighter combat, those could usually be overcome by sound tactical doctrine, and the design approach of the Italians and Japanese made their planes ill-suited as interceptors or attack aircraft.
Macchi MC.200 in the markings of 372° Sq. Regia Aeronautica
[edit]European theater
During the invasion of Poland and the Battle of France, Luftwaffe fighters—primarily the Messerschmitt Bf 109—held air superiority, and the Luftwaffe played a major role in German victories in these campaigns. During the Battle of Britain, however, British Hurricanes and Spitfires proved roughly equal to Luftwaffe fighters. Additionally Britain's use of radar and the advantages of fighting above Britain's home territory allowed the RAF to deny Germany air superiority, saving Britain from German invasion and dealing the Axis their first major defeat of the Second World War.
Fighter Jet For Sale
Fighter Jet For Sale
Fighter Jet For Sale
Fighter Jet For Sale
Fighter Jet For Sale
Fighter Jet For Sale
Fighter Jet For Sale
Fighter Jet For Sale
Fighter Jet For Sale
Fighter Jet For Sale

Fighter Jet For Sale
Fighter Jet For Sale
Fighter Jet For Sale
Fighter Jet For Sale
Fighter Jet For Sale

Fighter Jet For Sale
Fighter Jet For Sale
Fighter Jet For Sale
Fighter Jet For Sale
Fighter Jet For Sale



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